Posts Tagged 'videos'

In American a Kid Drops Out of High School Every 9 Seconds…

Imagine if they didn’t.

And so goes the opening statement of the above documentary. I have to wonder what the dropout statistics are for India, Sri Lanka, the UAE…

Visit the homepage of the above documentary and you’ll learn:

This is the compelling question behind award-winning filmmaker Mary Mazzio’s newest project Ten9Eight, a thought provoking film which tells the inspirational stories of several inner city teens (of differing race, religion and ethnicity) from Harlem to Compton and all points in between, as they compete in an annual business plan competition run by the Network for Teaching Entrepreneurship (NFTE).

I hope this film makes it out of the States and to other countries that face the challenge of high dropouts, keeping schools relevant and keeping the classroom inspiring! As President Obama recently stated:

I am calling on our nation’s governors and state education chiefs to develop standards and assessments that don’t simply measure whether students can fill in a bubble on a test, but whether they possess 21st century skills like problem-solving & critical thinking, entrepreneurship and creativity.

To see where Ten9Eight is showing this fall, click here.

Just imagine…

Anna

@bon_education

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An educational website and event you won’t want to miss… (TEDxDubai 2009)

TEDxDubai_logo

Dear Literacy is Priceless Readers,

I am writing to inform you on that on Saturday October 10, 2009, educator Kevin Simpson and I will broadcast the TEDxDubai 2009 conference from the Twitter name @TEDxDubai. For those of you that are new to TED, here is a summary from the TED (HQ) website:

TED is a small nonprofit devoted to Ideas Worth Spreading. It started out (in 1984) as a conference bringing together people from three worlds: Technology, Entertainment, Design. Since then its scope has become ever broader. Along with the annual TED Conference in Long Beach, California, and the TEDGlobal conference in Oxford UK, TED includes the award-winning TEDTalks video site, the Open Translation Program, the new TEDx community program, this year’s TEDIndia Conference and the annual TED Prize.

If you’ve never visited the TED website nor witnessed a TEDTalk, I highly encourage you to drop what you are doing and take the next 20 minutes to listen to entrepreneurs like Bill Gates (TEDTalk: on mosquitos, malaria and education), comedians like Emily Levine (TEDTalk: theory of everything), MIT graduate students like David Merrill (TEDTalk: Siftables), and musicians like 11 year old violinist Sirena Huang (TEDTalk: live violin performance!) share with the world “ideas worth spreading”.

What I love about the TED website is that it harnesses the educational opportunities of the web to provide anyone and everyone free exposure to ideas from some of the world’s top scientists, creators, writers and more!

In order to inspire others, we must be inspired ourselves… Watch a TEDTalk and tune into @TEDxDubai on Saturday to hear ideas worth spreading!

Sincerely,

Anna

Founder, Bon Education

a.k.a. Official TEDxDubai Blogger/Tweeter (on 10.10.09)

P.S. Here are a couple of past Literacy is Priceless posts about education-focused TEDTalks:

P.P.S. To see the line-up of TEDxDubaiTalks for Saturday, click here.

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Digital Storytelling in a Nutshell

I just published a blog on Curriki that I think Literacy is Priceless readers will find useful. To see the original post, click here. Or, continue reading below. -Anna

If you are looking for a project to build your students’ communication and digital literacy skills, why not have them participate in a digital storytelling project?! As this excellent introduction to digital storytelling by Curriki member Robin Surland points out:

Digital storytelling consists of a series of still images or video images, combined with a narrated soundtrack to tell a story. Many times an additional music track is added to invoke emotions.

Once, you’ve reviewed Robin’s excellent backgrounder, you’ll be ready to take a look at the link Curriki member Anne Leftwich posted here that provides in-depth information on how to create a digital story. Thanks Anne!

Need help visualizing the process before you get started? Here’s “How to make a Digital Story” in a nutshell:

  • Determine what personal experience you wish to present in your story. If you need a bit of help selecting a topic, try filling out this worksheet on the seven basic elements of a digital story by Indiana University.
  • Select images that you wish to display in your story. Beyond your own digital photos, Flickr (creative commons licensed images) and OpenStockPhotography are useful places to find images to accompany your narration. Indiana University has a nice template that will help you storyboard your ideas.
  • Draft a 3-5 minute script to accompany your images.
  • Select music (optional). ccMixer and Open Source Audio are two places where you can find large quantities of open music. Make sure that the track you select allows you to share and remix the original music. For example, click on the cc box featured on the left hand side of this audio. You should be directed to this page that tells you exactly what you can and cannot do with the track.
  • Note: If you find this whole copyright thing confusing (i.e., What images and music from the Internet are you allowed to use legally in your digital story?), the Creative Commons website has lots of great advise. The Wanna Work Together video is particularly helpful.
  • Pull it all together! Create a final storyboard that clearly shows how your images, script and music will all fit together. Indiana University has provided a useful template for this.
  • Select which software you are going to use to create your digital story. Here is a list of possibilies. Voicethread is another nice tool for this. To learn how to use Voicethread, watch this YouTube tutorial.
  • Produce your digital story!
  • Share it with others! (The fun part!)
  • Create a digital storytelling assignment for your students and share your lesson plan with others in the Curriki community here.

For more detailed information on digital storytelling, take a look at the Digital Storytelling Cookbook from the Center for Digital Storytelling. Or, take a moment to watch the YouTube video above (created by Stanford’s Teacher Education Program).

Have fun and feel free to share additional digital storytelling resources in the comments section of this post.

Anna

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Paid Summer Curricula Writing Opportunity for Teachers @Curriki

The summer is a great time to catch up on books, sleep and the beach. That said, why not pick up a little extra cash this June, July and August while helping educators around the world to boot?!

This summer Curriki is sponsoring its annual Summer of Content initiative:

Paid Summer Lesson Writing Opportunity

Do you have an instructional unit or course you’re proud of that you’d like to publish and get paid for?

Interested in earning money this summer to develop a new unit that will be shared with a global audience?

For our Summer of Content initiative, Curriki is soliciting elementary and middle school content in ELA, math, science, and social studies. Apply by April 15th, 2009. For more details, click here.

About Curriki

Curriki is a social entrepreneurship organization that supports the development and free distribution of open source educational materials to improve education worldwide. The online community gives teachers, students and parents universal access to a wealth of peer-reviewed primary and secondary curricula, and powerful online collaboration tools. Curriki is building a unique web site that offers complete, open courses of instruction and assessment. Founded by Sun Microsystems in 2004, the organization has operated as an independent nonprofit since 2006.

Curriki originated from the idea that technology can play a crucial role in breaking down the barriers of the Education Divide – the gap between those who have access to high-quality education and those who do not. The initial focus is on primary and secondary curricula in the areas of literacy, mathematics, science, technology, language arts, and foreign languages. The site has already been translated into Spanish, French, German, Hindi and Indonesian Bahasa. Moving forward Curriki aims to become a vital resource of Arabic language reading and curricula materials as well. To learn more about Curriki please visit the site and watch this video.

Hope to see your ELA lessons on Curriki! Regardless, please visit the site to find thousands of free lessons and learning objects. You won’t be disappointed!

Anna

P.S. I am quite enjoying Curriki’s tweets on Twitter. To follow Curriki, click here.

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How do you make a teacher great? (Gates on Education)

The new TED talks are live which means my commutes to and from schools are now filled with podcasts by some of the most influential minds of our generation including, Eva Zeisel (Ceramics), Sugata Mitra (Education and how kids teach themselves), Philip Rosedale (Second Life)… This morning I watched Bill Gates discuss two challenging questions his foundation is trying to understand and tackle:

  • How do we stop a deadly disease that is spread by mosquitoes?
  • How do you make a teacher great?

Take a moment to watch the following video and engage with Gates as he elaborates on:

  • Where are great teachers being made?
  • What schools send the majority of children to four year colleges?
  • What classrooms truly engage their students?
  • What tools and data do teachers need to further their professional development and pedagogy skills?

If you are interested in learning more about TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design), click here. This is by far one of the most educational websites/initiatives I’ve run across in a long time!

Cheers,

Anna

P.S. Given that it is already the first of March, summer is right around the corner! As you make plans for May, June, and July, many of you may be interested in submitting early literacy curricula to Curriki‘s Summer of Content initiative. Select teachers will receive a stipend for submitting curricula and will have the opportunity to share and have their work promoted to teachers and institutions across the globe. To learn more and apply, click here.

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Technology literacy: social media, Twitter, blogs, photo sharing and more…

Keeping on top of technology trends can be tough between lesson plans, grading, and taking care of your students, family and self. Thanks to Common Craft, educating yourself about topics such as social media, Twitter, blogs, etc. is as easy as watching a 3 minute video clip! As the site’s founders (Sachi and Lee) explain, “Our videos are short, simple and focused on making complex ideas easy to understand.”

So, sit back, relax and enjoy the follow Common Craft Show titled, “Social Media in Plain English” …

Anna

P.S. If you have a bit more time and feel like being inspired to incorporate more technology tools into your classroom lesson and center time, take 20 minutes to watch this video of Sugata Mitra as he explains his research on children and technology.

In 1999, Sugata Mitra and his colleagues dug a hole in a wall bordering an urban slum in New Delhi, installed an Internet-connected PC, and left it there (with a hidden camera filming the area). What they saw was kids from the slum playing around with the computer and in the process learning how to use it and how to go online, and then teaching each other.

In the following years they replicated the experiment in other parts of India, urban and rural, with similar results, challenging some of the key assumptions of formal education. The “Hole in the Wall” project demonstrates that, even in the absence of any direct input from a teacher, an environment that stimulates curiosity can cause learning through self-instruction and peer-shared knowledge. Mitra, who’s now a professor of educational technology at Newcastle University (UK), calls it “minimally invasive education.”

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Sesame Videos!

Recently I discovered Sesame Workshop’s online video collection. It is absolutely fabulous and on top of that it is free!

Use the search bar to find videos that target key literacy skills, science concepts and more! For example, if you type the word “reading” in the search bar here, you’ll be directed to dozens of Sesame clips that have been created over the years to help young children learn basic literacy skills. I absolutely adore the clip titled Doug E. Doug and Elmo!

This site is definitely worth bookmarking and sharing! Enjoy!

Anna

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Midwest Tech Forum Podcasts and Videos are up.

Last month Kellie Doubek and I presented a session titled “Supporting Reading and Literacy with Technology Tools” at Midwest Tech Forum. To listen to a podcast of the session, click here.

If you are interested in viewing the handouts from the session you can find them here. To see videos and podcasts from other presenters such as Sheryl Nussbaum-Beach click here.

Anna

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Free ELL Literacy Resources on the Web

While reading the latest issue of T.H.E. journal, I came across a very useful article about online resources for ELL teachers and students. In the article, ELL Spoken Here, I learned about the following resources:

  1. Childtopia-This site has a ton of educational games in multiple languages to help children develop literacy and writing skills. I like the Learn to Draw the Letters Game.
  2. ESL Flashcards-In need of flashcards, but don’t have time to make them or care to buy them? This is a great site to bookmark!
  3. Kindersay-My favorite resource mentioned in the article! This site has a ton of free videos to help develop vocabulary in young children and ELL students! Try it here.

Thanks Neal Starkman for writing ELL Spoken Here!

Anna

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Sight Word Videos

Check out this short sight word video by Karen (a member of the FreeReading Community). Before making more videos, she’d like feedback from teachers and reading coaches like you! So, if you have a moment, feel free to share your comments and thoughts here.

Anna

Find more videos like this on Classroom 2.0

Doing a unit on animals? Check out National Geographic Kids!

After writing my last post, I started poking around the Internet for resources that I could use for developing lessons around the unit theme “Animals.”

National Geographic Kids is a fantastic resource to incorporate into animal-themed literacy centers, computer time, science units and more! The number of free animal videos on the site makes this a resource worth adding to your favorites list!

I like the National Geographic Cartoon Factory–a game where children are given various cartoons with empty thought bubbles. After typing their own dialogues into the bubbles, students can print out their cartoons to take home and put on the fridge! -Anna

Lost for Words

My friend Margaret, sent me the link to Lost for Words (a show about reading in the UK) today. The site explains, “Lost For Words is a Channel 4 season of campaigning programmes to get all our kids reading.” I was immediately intrigued by the program and the website because as a former Comparative Education major and early literacy teacher in Japan I have always been interested in how schools in different countries approach similar problems such as closing the achievement gap and teaching children how to read.

The site is filled with lots of videos, information on learning and and tips for teaching reading, and in particular information about synthetic phonics.

Watch the video on this page to learn about how the children at the Monteagle School struggle to learn how to read at first. Then watch the other videos on the site to see what method of teaching educators used at the school to better help their children learn how to read. Finally, watch the video about Liam–a struggling reader that is beginning not only to read, but to love reading! -Anna

Reading Rockets!

While surfing the Net today, I found the website for Reading Rockets–a fun TV show on PBS that teaches educators and caregivers about the stages of early literacy development. I love this site because it is filled with straight forward articles on how to teach reading and reading research. In addition, it is filled will streaming videos of teachers in real classrooms across the States modeling best practices around reading pedagogy. Check out this video on spelling and word families. I also like this video on invented spelling! -Anna


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