Posts Tagged 'video'

An educational website and event you won’t want to miss… (TEDxDubai 2009)

TEDxDubai_logo

Dear Literacy is Priceless Readers,

I am writing to inform you on that on Saturday October 10, 2009, educator Kevin Simpson and I will broadcast the TEDxDubai 2009 conference from the Twitter name @TEDxDubai. For those of you that are new to TED, here is a summary from the TED (HQ) website:

TED is a small nonprofit devoted to Ideas Worth Spreading. It started out (in 1984) as a conference bringing together people from three worlds: Technology, Entertainment, Design. Since then its scope has become ever broader. Along with the annual TED Conference in Long Beach, California, and the TEDGlobal conference in Oxford UK, TED includes the award-winning TEDTalks video site, the Open Translation Program, the new TEDx community program, this year’s TEDIndia Conference and the annual TED Prize.

If you’ve never visited the TED website nor witnessed a TEDTalk, I highly encourage you to drop what you are doing and take the next 20 minutes to listen to entrepreneurs like Bill Gates (TEDTalk: on mosquitos, malaria and education), comedians like Emily Levine (TEDTalk: theory of everything), MIT graduate students like David Merrill (TEDTalk: Siftables), and musicians like 11 year old violinist Sirena Huang (TEDTalk: live violin performance!) share with the world “ideas worth spreading”.

What I love about the TED website is that it harnesses the educational opportunities of the web to provide anyone and everyone free exposure to ideas from some of the world’s top scientists, creators, writers and more!

In order to inspire others, we must be inspired ourselves… Watch a TEDTalk and tune into @TEDxDubai on Saturday to hear ideas worth spreading!

Sincerely,

Anna

Founder, Bon Education

a.k.a. Official TEDxDubai Blogger/Tweeter (on 10.10.09)

P.S. Here are a couple of past Literacy is Priceless posts about education-focused TEDTalks:

P.P.S. To see the line-up of TEDxDubaiTalks for Saturday, click here.

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Digital Storytelling in a Nutshell

I just published a blog on Curriki that I think Literacy is Priceless readers will find useful. To see the original post, click here. Or, continue reading below. -Anna

If you are looking for a project to build your students’ communication and digital literacy skills, why not have them participate in a digital storytelling project?! As this excellent introduction to digital storytelling by Curriki member Robin Surland points out:

Digital storytelling consists of a series of still images or video images, combined with a narrated soundtrack to tell a story. Many times an additional music track is added to invoke emotions.

Once, you’ve reviewed Robin’s excellent backgrounder, you’ll be ready to take a look at the link Curriki member Anne Leftwich posted here that provides in-depth information on how to create a digital story. Thanks Anne!

Need help visualizing the process before you get started? Here’s “How to make a Digital Story” in a nutshell:

  • Determine what personal experience you wish to present in your story. If you need a bit of help selecting a topic, try filling out this worksheet on the seven basic elements of a digital story by Indiana University.
  • Select images that you wish to display in your story. Beyond your own digital photos, Flickr (creative commons licensed images) and OpenStockPhotography are useful places to find images to accompany your narration. Indiana University has a nice template that will help you storyboard your ideas.
  • Draft a 3-5 minute script to accompany your images.
  • Select music (optional). ccMixer and Open Source Audio are two places where you can find large quantities of open music. Make sure that the track you select allows you to share and remix the original music. For example, click on the cc box featured on the left hand side of this audio. You should be directed to this page that tells you exactly what you can and cannot do with the track.
  • Note: If you find this whole copyright thing confusing (i.e., What images and music from the Internet are you allowed to use legally in your digital story?), the Creative Commons website has lots of great advise. The Wanna Work Together video is particularly helpful.
  • Pull it all together! Create a final storyboard that clearly shows how your images, script and music will all fit together. Indiana University has provided a useful template for this.
  • Select which software you are going to use to create your digital story. Here is a list of possibilies. Voicethread is another nice tool for this. To learn how to use Voicethread, watch this YouTube tutorial.
  • Produce your digital story!
  • Share it with others! (The fun part!)
  • Create a digital storytelling assignment for your students and share your lesson plan with others in the Curriki community here.

For more detailed information on digital storytelling, take a look at the Digital Storytelling Cookbook from the Center for Digital Storytelling. Or, take a moment to watch the YouTube video above (created by Stanford’s Teacher Education Program).

Have fun and feel free to share additional digital storytelling resources in the comments section of this post.

Anna

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Childhood Dreams

I just finished listening to “the Last Lecture” by Randy Pausch. After seeing the book in airports and bookstores across the Middle East, Europe and the States, I figured that I might as well see what all the press was about, not to mention all of the hype on You Tube.

So, prior to my journey last week to give technology trainings to teachers in a small village in the mountains of the UAE, I downloaded the audio book to pass the car ride along—desert, followed by rocks, followed by jagged mountains amidst 120 degree heat and haze.

In a nutshell, the book left me thinking for hours, reminding myself of life’s pleasures and priorities and the gift and responsibility teachers have of inspiring, challenging and enabling young (and old) minds to achieve their dreams, imagine, think big and do.

For those of you that need a bit of background information, The Last Lecture website summarizes:

On September 18, 2007, computer science professor Randy Pausch stepped in front of an audience of 400 people at Carnegie Mellon University to deliver a last lecture called “Really Achieving Your Childhood Dreams.” With slides of his CT scans beaming out to the audience, Randy told his audience about the cancer that is devouring his pancreas and that will claim his life in a matter of months. On the stage that day, Randy was youthful, energetic, handsome, often cheerfully, darkly funny. He seemed invincible. But this was a brief moment, as he himself acknowledged.

Randy’s lecture has become a phenomenon, as has the book he wrote based on the same principles, celebrating the dreams we all strive to make realities. Sadly, Randy lost his battle to pancreatic cancer on July 25th, 2008, but his legacy will continue to inspire us all, for generations to come.

Pausch for the most part tells us the lessons he wished he could teach his kids if he were around to watch them grow into adults. His messages are simple, easy to relate to and grounded in a ton of Disney World metaphors and examples (one of Pausch’s dreams was to become an imagineer—a dream he accomplished), making the book very digestible across a wide variety of audiences. Perhaps it is his simple lessons and prose that make the messages so sticky (see Will your lessons stand the test of time?).

In the addendum of the audio book, there is a live interview with the real Randy Pausch (the audio book of course was read by someone else) in which Pausch is asked, “What inspired the topic of your lecture?” Pausch responds, “A list that I made at the age of eight, ‘My Lifelong Dreams'”.

As you think about topics to teach this summer or next fall, consider having your students write or create a multimedia response to the theme, “My Dreams”. While you’re at it, take a moment to recollect yours.

Happy Dreamin’!

From Dubai,
Anna

P.S. My favorite quote from the book, “Brick walls are there for a reason. And once you get over them – even if someone practically had to throw you over – it can be helpful to others to tell them how you did it”.

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AfterEd

Keep up-to-date with education news and developments around the world by tuning into the videos on AfterEd. AfterEd is a project sponsored by the Teachers College EdLab. A former member of the lab, I am very excited to see AfterEd evolve! Bringing videos and other forms of multimedia into the classroom can certainly help motivate students, while at the same time building literacy and technology skills. Check out this video on Video Games in Japan or watch my friend Karen discuss her dissertation research on schools in Indonesia! Perhaps your students will enjoy watching the videos and contributing to the site!

Anna

“Once upon a time the animals had a school…”

Sometimes it is nice to take a step back and reflect upon the things we do from day to day in the classroom and their wider implications. Tonight I received an email from an old classmate of mine at Teachers College. It contained a link to a short video called “Animal School.”

The video is certainly thought provoking (especially in an era of “No Child Left Behind”). While watching it, I immediately thought of many of my former students–a few ducks, polar bears, zebras and bees! Check out how others responded to the video here. -Anna

Word Families

This past summer, I spent some time with my colleagues producing videos of educators teaching reading for Free-Reading. Watch the video below to get ideas for teaching word families. For additional videos click here. I hope you enjoy these clips. We had a great time producing them! -Anna


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