Posts Tagged 'teaching resources'

Internet Copyright: Be in the Know!

I just posted the blog entry below on the Curriki blog and suspect that the LIP community will find it of use as well. To see the original post, click here.

Recently on Twitter, I posted a link to “Copyright and Open Content: What do you know?”—a lesson by Curriki member Karen Fasimpaur. Not only did the link get RTed seemingly hundreds of times, but it also got a record number of clicks indicating that Internet Copyright is a topic of interest to members of the Curriki and edutweeter community alike.

As I am sure many of you have discovered in the past few years, being able to mix and mash digital content in new and interesting ways is a definite requisite of the 21st Century. So, before you or your students post another report, blog or multimedia presentation online, make sure you know the answers to the following questions:

1) If you have drawn a picture, written a song, or taken a photo, you own the copyright (even if you don’t put a © symbol on it).

  • True or false?

2) What do you have to do legally to use a copyrighted work in something you’re going to post to the Internet?

  • Copy and paste it.
  • Cite the source.
  • Get the creator’s permission.
  • Nothing

3) You can use any picture on the Internet legally in something you’re going to publish.

  • True or false?

4) How long does copyright last?

  • 10 years
  • 50 years
  • the life of the creator
  • the life of the creator + 70 years

5) You can’t legally use anything copyrighted without contacting the creator and getting permission.

  • True or false?

Check your answers here and check out Karen’s fabulously useful lesson on how to teach students about copyrights and open content here (assessment included!). Make sure to download this one-page overview of open licenses for future reference as well!

When it comes to Internet Copyright, it only takes a few minutes to learn your rights and responsibilities. Start learning now! And when you finish going through this lesson, click on over to the Creative Commons website to find a license for your next digital masterpiece!

Oh, and just in case you were wondering, Karen’s lesson is licensed under the Creative Commons Attributions 3.0 license.

Thanks Karen!

Anna

@bon_education

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Digital Storytelling in a Nutshell

I just published a blog on Curriki that I think Literacy is Priceless readers will find useful. To see the original post, click here. Or, continue reading below. -Anna

If you are looking for a project to build your students’ communication and digital literacy skills, why not have them participate in a digital storytelling project?! As this excellent introduction to digital storytelling by Curriki member Robin Surland points out:

Digital storytelling consists of a series of still images or video images, combined with a narrated soundtrack to tell a story. Many times an additional music track is added to invoke emotions.

Once, you’ve reviewed Robin’s excellent backgrounder, you’ll be ready to take a look at the link Curriki member Anne Leftwich posted here that provides in-depth information on how to create a digital story. Thanks Anne!

Need help visualizing the process before you get started? Here’s “How to make a Digital Story” in a nutshell:

  • Determine what personal experience you wish to present in your story. If you need a bit of help selecting a topic, try filling out this worksheet on the seven basic elements of a digital story by Indiana University.
  • Select images that you wish to display in your story. Beyond your own digital photos, Flickr (creative commons licensed images) and OpenStockPhotography are useful places to find images to accompany your narration. Indiana University has a nice template that will help you storyboard your ideas.
  • Draft a 3-5 minute script to accompany your images.
  • Select music (optional). ccMixer and Open Source Audio are two places where you can find large quantities of open music. Make sure that the track you select allows you to share and remix the original music. For example, click on the cc box featured on the left hand side of this audio. You should be directed to this page that tells you exactly what you can and cannot do with the track.
  • Note: If you find this whole copyright thing confusing (i.e., What images and music from the Internet are you allowed to use legally in your digital story?), the Creative Commons website has lots of great advise. The Wanna Work Together video is particularly helpful.
  • Pull it all together! Create a final storyboard that clearly shows how your images, script and music will all fit together. Indiana University has provided a useful template for this.
  • Select which software you are going to use to create your digital story. Here is a list of possibilies. Voicethread is another nice tool for this. To learn how to use Voicethread, watch this YouTube tutorial.
  • Produce your digital story!
  • Share it with others! (The fun part!)
  • Create a digital storytelling assignment for your students and share your lesson plan with others in the Curriki community here.

For more detailed information on digital storytelling, take a look at the Digital Storytelling Cookbook from the Center for Digital Storytelling. Or, take a moment to watch the YouTube video above (created by Stanford’s Teacher Education Program).

Have fun and feel free to share additional digital storytelling resources in the comments section of this post.

Anna

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Audiobooks on the Go…

My Travel Gear by Jon Rawlinson

Over the last month and a half I’ve been to Dubai, Fujairah, Abu Dhabi, Muscat, Amsterdam, San Juan PR, San Germán PR, Charlotte NC, NY NY, Washington DC and Fairfax County VA logging dozens of hours in planes, cars and buses, not to mention several back issues of Wired Magazine, Julie and Julia, bits of Over Promise and Over Deliver, Match Me If You Can (audio) and the beginning of The Pillars of the Earth (audio). If it weren’t for my trusted iPod and large purse (which fits my laptop plus a book), my travels to and from schools to universities to family would have been very LOOOONG!

Luckily Audible and iTunes have a wonderful selection of audiobooks that can be downloaded from just about any country or airport savvy enough to grace its customers with free wifi (I know, if I had an iPhone I wouldn’t always be on a desperate hunt for hotspots! One gadget at a time!). Regardless, if you dine on audiobooks at the rate I do, you are likely to put on a few pound in the credit department!

Fortunately, Lit2Go might be just be the audiobook lovers version of Weight Watchers–Dine on what you want, but in portions that you won’t regret later. Who could pass up a delightfully free and high quality The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn audio/text? Or, a gratis afternoon of Jane Eyre?!

The site states:

Lit2Go is a free online collection of stories and poems in Mp3 (audiobook) format. You can:

  • Download the files to your Mp3 player and listen on the go,
  • Listen to the Mp3 files on your computer,
  • View the text on a webpage and read along as you listen,
  • Print out the stories and poems to make your own book.

Happy audiobook searching by author, title, keyword or reading level!

Anna

PS Thanks to Jim Moulton for point out this resources and many others in his Edutopia article, “How to Become More Tech Savvy This Summer“. The photo above was taken by Jon Rawlinson.

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Will your lessons stand the test of time? … How to make your teaching stick!

Made to Stick

What is a pomelo?

(Please pause and think.)

Chip and Dan: Explanation 1: A pomelo is the largest citrus fruit. The rind is very think but soft and easy to peel away. The resulting fruit has a light yellow to coral pink flesh and can vary from juicy to slightly dry and from seductively spicy-sweet to tangy and tart.

Question: If you mixed pomelo juice half and half with orange juice, would it taste good?

Anna: Not sure? How about now?

Chip and Dan: Explanation 2. A pomelo is basically a supersized grapefruit with a very thick and soft rind.

Anna: Now, let’s revisit: If you mixed pomelo juice half and half with orange juice, would it taste good?

This summer while perusing the shelves of Borders, Barnes and Noble and Kinokuniya, make sure to keep an eye out for Made to Stick: Why some ideas take hold and others come unstuck.

Chip and Dan will show you how to teach complex concepts in easy to grasp terms. In a nutshell, you will learn WHAT STICKS!

Anna

P.S. Preview: Sticky ideas are a S.U.C.C.E.S.—Simple, Unexpected, Concrete, Credible, Emotional, Stories.

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WebQuests: Take your students to far off lands with the click of a few buttons

WebQuests are a wonderful way to build your students’ critical background knowledge, reading and technology literacy skills. As stated by Wikipedia, “A WebQuest is a learning activity used by educators. During this activity learners read, analyze, and synthesize information using the World Wide Web”.

To learn more about finding, creating and sharing WebQuests, I highly recommend that you visit WebQuest.org. If you are interested in the research that supports using WebQuests in the classroom, click here.

Using the “Find a WebQuest” feature on WebQuest.org, I found these WebQuests about my favorite topics:

If you find other WebQuests of note, please feel free to share them here!

Happy Questing!

Anna

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Literacy and Learning Resources by Theme and Grade Level

While we all wish we had more time to find the perfect Internet resources and audiovisuals for our lessons… The reality is, there just aren’t enough hours in the day to do so! Luckily, the eMints National Center, has put together a wonderful website with themed Internet resources by grade level here! Many of the resources are even linked to state standards to boot! Woohoo!

Looking for first grade-friendly Earth Day materials? (Click here.)

Is your third grade class studying barn owls? (Click here.)

How about 6th grade materials on Ancient Rome? (Click here.)

If you have a themed unit coming up, eMint’s eThemes resources is a must-check! Search the resources alphabetically by theme, by grade-level, or via search!

Let Literacy is Priceless know if you find a particular themed resource worth shouting about!

Sincerely,

Anna

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Paid Summer Curricula Writing Opportunity for Teachers @Curriki

The summer is a great time to catch up on books, sleep and the beach. That said, why not pick up a little extra cash this June, July and August while helping educators around the world to boot?!

This summer Curriki is sponsoring its annual Summer of Content initiative:

Paid Summer Lesson Writing Opportunity

Do you have an instructional unit or course you’re proud of that you’d like to publish and get paid for?

Interested in earning money this summer to develop a new unit that will be shared with a global audience?

For our Summer of Content initiative, Curriki is soliciting elementary and middle school content in ELA, math, science, and social studies. Apply by April 15th, 2009. For more details, click here.

About Curriki

Curriki is a social entrepreneurship organization that supports the development and free distribution of open source educational materials to improve education worldwide. The online community gives teachers, students and parents universal access to a wealth of peer-reviewed primary and secondary curricula, and powerful online collaboration tools. Curriki is building a unique web site that offers complete, open courses of instruction and assessment. Founded by Sun Microsystems in 2004, the organization has operated as an independent nonprofit since 2006.

Curriki originated from the idea that technology can play a crucial role in breaking down the barriers of the Education Divide – the gap between those who have access to high-quality education and those who do not. The initial focus is on primary and secondary curricula in the areas of literacy, mathematics, science, technology, language arts, and foreign languages. The site has already been translated into Spanish, French, German, Hindi and Indonesian Bahasa. Moving forward Curriki aims to become a vital resource of Arabic language reading and curricula materials as well. To learn more about Curriki please visit the site and watch this video.

Hope to see your ELA lessons on Curriki! Regardless, please visit the site to find thousands of free lessons and learning objects. You won’t be disappointed!

Anna

P.S. I am quite enjoying Curriki’s tweets on Twitter. To follow Curriki, click here.

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Laura Candler

Teaching Resources from Laura Candler is full of exceptional ideas for the classroom. She is an experienced teacher who enjoys sharing her resources.

 

Over the years I have created a collection of blackline masters and activities for my classes. I enjoy sharing those resources with other teachers and have placed them online in my virtual File Cabinet. I’ve also written five print books and five eBooks for teachers.

 

Inside her virtual file cabinet you can find everything from health and science activities to center ideas. I especially love her literacy idea for book buddies. Students pair up for just five minutes a day to discuss the books they are reading with one another. There is even a printable log and bookmark to go along with this activity. – Melissa

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Browser Books

I was recently perusing Paul Hamilton’s Blog, The Treasure Chest of Free Stuff, when I came across Browser Books.

 This website was created to allow beginning readers to read books on their web browser. Readers can click on the triangle in the lower right-hand corner of each page to turn the pages. If they are unsure of a word, they can click on it to hear a child’s voice read the word to them.  

The site is easy to use.  Books can be searched by subject or level.  I’ll be adding to this to my computer center after Winter Vacation.

-Melissa

Welcome!

Welcome to the Literacy is Priceless blog. I am a first-time blogger, so bare with me, as I get used to this new online world…

 

I guess I should start by introducing myself. I am a first grade teacher on the south side of Chicago. Like most public school teachers, I find myself with too many kids in my class, not enough help, and the ever-present problem of a broken copy machine. When I am not in school, I am busy planning my upcoming wedding. Busy is pretty much the theme of my life for the moment!

We all know that most teachers are pressed for time. That is why I want to share this great website with all of you. Check out Kidzone. The free printables save lots of time. I haven’t used it yet, but the word family card game listed under 2nd grade will definitely be at my Game Board Center next week. And I did the poem worksheet #2 with my class last week. I needed a quick writing activity. Well, actually I needed something cute to display for the parents at Open House! Either way, it worked out well. We did Worksheet #2 in class as a rough draft, and then I had them recopy a final draft and illustrate it. I hope you find this site as useful as I have.

Melissa

To K-3 Literacy Teachers Around the Globe!

Welcome to our blog! As frugal and creative K-3 reading enthusiasts we are always sharing fun and free reading resources on the web with each other. This blog is our attempt to share useful ideas, activities and downloads with K-3 reading teachers across the globe.

We hope you find our blog posts useful and we welcome you to post your teaching stories and great-teaching-finds-on-the-web as well!

Sincerely,

Anna and Melissa


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