Posts Tagged 'printables'

Open Education Resources and Links (Re: Dubai ISTE Conference Links)

Tomorrow I will give a presentation on “Open and Collaboratively Developed Education Resources” at the 2009 Gobal Forum on Innovation and Technology in Teaching and Leading in Dubai. So that presentation attendees don’t have to take copious notes (and so that others can benefit as well), I’ve decided to post links from my presentation here!

Just in case you’re wondering what open education resources (OERs) areWikipedia defines OERs as “educational materials and resources offered freely and openly for anyone to use and under some licenses to re-mix, improve and redistribute.” I like to think of OERs like a delicious cookie recipe–Sara passes her recipe to Michiko. Michiko decides to add dark chocolate chips to the recipe and passes the recipe along to several people over the Internet. Mustafa gets a hold of the recipe and decides it would benefit from some rock salt and an egg yolk. He then posts the recipe for others to see… and so on! Just replace the cookie recipe with a lesson plan, an educational video or a collaboratively developed unit or other resource and you’ve got yourself an OER!

There are several fabulous OER projects that are 100% worth checking out if you are looking for lessons, eager to share resources or interested in collaborating on education projects with people around the globe:

  • FreeReading–a K-3 open source literacy curricula program and community
  • Curriki–a community of educators that share K-12 multilingual OERs with people across the globe
  • MIT Open Courseware–with over 1000 free college courses online, this one is NOT to be missed
  • Open Learning Initiative–sponsored by Carnegie Mellon, take a look at the site’s tutors, virtual labs, intro courses and more!
  • Connexions–Based out of Rice University, the site contains content in the areas of arts, business, humanities, math and tech and social sciences
  • CK-12–if you are look for free full textbooks, this site is a must-bookmark!
  • OER Commons–more wonderful K-12 and higher ed OERs! Do a search for OERs and you’ll find a ton of useful background information on using and finding OERs

Finally, if you are interested in finding teachers to collaborate with on OERs or other cross-border initiatives, make sure to spend some time on:

  • The Global Education Collaborative–“a community of teachers interested in global education”
  • ePals–connect with thousands of teachers and students around the world on collaborative education and volunteer projects
  • Curriki groups–create or find a group that interests you and start building and exchanging OERs

Enjoy,

Anna

PS Don’t forget to think about copyrights when you use and post OERs! To find a flexible license for your intellectual property, take a look at the Creative Commons!

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Speakaboos!

One of my favorite things to do during the holidays is go through my delicious bookmarks and review the education sites that various people have recommended to me. Today I explored a real gem called Speakaboos! The site’s about section explains:

Speakaboos brings classic children’s entertainment into a digital world. Beloved characters and treasured stories are given new life through amazing celebrity performances, beautiful illustrations, and original music. At Speakaboos, children develop literacy skills while learning about technology in a safe and fun environment.

Take a look at these Speakaboo video story favorites, fables, nursery rhymes, fairy tales, folk tales and lullabies. Each animated story is read by celebrities such as Kevin Bacon and Jeff Donovan and contains illustrations by these fabulous artists. In addition, the text of each tale is displayed on the screen as the story is read making this a great site to keep on hand for computer time and/or center time during your K-1 literacy block.

Curious? Check out this video of Jack and the Beanstalk! In addition to the animated story, the site provides accompanying spelling, illustration and word search activities for young readers and a story guide for teachers and parents including comprehension, discussion and extension questions, as well as research activities and notes on this particular adaptation of Jack and the Beanstalk.

In addition to providing dozens of stories, take a look at these literacy activities. Pretty soon the site will enable readers to record and share their own tales! Hopefully the site will add more social bookmarking and sharing tools soon as well!

Bravo Speakaboos! What a great site!

Anna

PS Thanks to my husband and mother-in-law (an ESL curricula and teaching specialist) for introducing me to Speakaboos!

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FreeReading.net adds over 250 free new printables, lessons and readers!

I am excited to announce that FreeReading now has over 250 new and FREE K-3 vocabulary, comprehension and morphology activities and printables! In addition, we just added 60 new illustrated beginning readers that focus on advanced phonics (compound words, word families, etc.), fluency and comprehension skills!

Vocabulary lessons target tier 2 vocabulary words from ~150 popular children’s stories including books like Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs and Fancy Nancy. To see all of the Vocabulary graphic organizers and build mastery activities click here. You can also find vocabulary activities by common themes such as family and friends and my world here.

Comprehension lessons focus on important skills and strategies such as identifying a purpose for reading, story elements, prediction and more. For links to all of the comprehension printables click here.

Morphology lessons include activities for the most popular prefixes and suffixes K-3 student encounter in texts and everyday conversations. For links to all of the morphology printables click here.

Finally, you can find links to 60 new illustrated FreeReading beginning readers here. I particularly like A Firefighter’s Thanksgiving and Transportation.

Check the new FreeReading resources out and tell your friends about FreeReading by sending them a link to FreeReading here.

Enjoy!

Anna

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Another site to bookmark: FREE phonics, comprehension, vocab and fluency printables!

Today, while on a flight to Florida en route to give a FreeReading presentation, I spent some time going through emails and resources I bookmarked over the last few months. While doing so, I came across an email from my friend Cynthia recommending that I look at Steck-Vaughn’s Professional Development Resources. Once I arrived at my hotel this evening, I took a look at the site and was quite impressed by the number of free and high quality research articles and classroom resources in the areas of phonics/phonological awareness, vocabulary, comprehension and fluency.

For example, take a look at:

  • Goldilocks and the Three Bears (Readers Theater, found in the fluency section of the site)
  • The story map chart (found in the comprehension resources)
  • The Frayer Model worksheet (found in the vocabulary section of the site)
  • The Amazing Alliteration worksheet (found in the phonological awareness resources)

This is definitely a resource to bookmark for use during summer school or next fall!

Signing off from Ft. Lauderdale, FL!

Anna

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Worksheet Generator

I just discovered the Worksheet Generator from Discovery Education. This handy tools lets you create your own worksheets – fill in the blank, mulitple choice, matching, scramble, word chop – in seconds. What a great time saver for the end of the school year! There are also a variety of pre-made worksheets to check out. –Melissa

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Laura Candler

Teaching Resources from Laura Candler is full of exceptional ideas for the classroom. She is an experienced teacher who enjoys sharing her resources.

 

Over the years I have created a collection of blackline masters and activities for my classes. I enjoy sharing those resources with other teachers and have placed them online in my virtual File Cabinet. I’ve also written five print books and five eBooks for teachers.

 

Inside her virtual file cabinet you can find everything from health and science activities to center ideas. I especially love her literacy idea for book buddies. Students pair up for just five minutes a day to discuss the books they are reading with one another. There is even a printable log and bookmark to go along with this activity. – Melissa

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Free Printables for Pre-K and K

Today my colleague Alexa mentioned to me that she showed FreeReading to her son’s preschool teacher. In response, I asked her what website the school has used in the past to find literacy activities and she responded, “BeginningReading.com“. Naturally, I was curious, so this evening I checked out the site.

Beginning Reading is a phonics program for young children just being exposed to print for the first time. Similar to FreeReading, it contains dozens of free printable materials. So, if you are in the market for a short vowel poster, alphabet writing worksheets, or fun book titled Lively Butterfies, this site is definitely worth a browse and slot on your phonics favorites list! Feel free to pass the site along to your Pre-K and K teacher friends. I also think Beginning Reading is useful for parents and grandparent of preschoolers.

Anna

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Endless String and Other Illustrated Children’s Texts

I never cease to be amazed by the talent and enthusiasm displayed by members of the FreeReading Community! Thanks to Cheryl Johnson for contributing 15 illustrations to the previously unillustrated texts on FreeReading! Below is her cover to the short story Endless String. To see the other story illustrations she’s created to-date (including Fran’s Magic Blanket, Festival Fun and Rat’s Candy Plan), click here. Feel free to print these stories for your students. They are great for practicing decoding, fluency and comprehension. Thanks Cheryl! -Anna

Worksheets galore!

Yesterday, my colleague Cher introduced me to  ABCTeach. If you are looking for a place to get high quality printables for free, ABCTeach is not a site to be ignored! Below are links to a few things you might find of interest:

1) Sample rebus worksheet: A Picnic is Fun. Find more rebus worksheets here.

2) Henry and Mudge vocabulary worksheet

3) Literature Circle Planner

See you on ABCTeach!

Anna

Graphic Organizers

I just discovered the Graphic Organizer Maker from Recipes4Success. This is a handy tool for when you find yourself in a bind and need something ASAP for the afternoon lesson. The site is easy to use, with clear directions. Click on the “new” button for a full explanation of how to create a customized organizer.

Use the graphic organizer Maker to create customized graphic organizer worksheets. Choose from concept maps, KWHL charts, Venn diagrams, timelines, cycles, and more. If this is your first time using the Graphic Organizer Maker, click the New button to begin.


I always find myself using graphic organizers in the classroom to teach reading comprehension strategies. I think I’ll use a Though Web or a Five Ws Chart to do some prewriting activities.

Classroom Tip: Make one copy of each organizer on an overhead projector sheet to use for whole group instruction.

-Melissa

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