Students speak out: What does it mean to be a 21st Century Learner?

Recently, while reading Bill Boyd – the Literacy Adviser, I came across the video below in which students from Ringwood School discuss what it means to be a 21st Century Learner.  What they say is actually very much in sync with the vision I hear adults at edtech conferences (such as ISTE) discuss all of the time. Now, the trick is how do we get large systems of schools to move swiftly in this direction! If you know of a school (or district) that embodies the vision painted below or that uses technology in creative and innovative ways, I welcome you to post a link to its website in the comments section of this blog so that other LIP readers can learn and discuss.

To learning in the 21st Century and beyond!

Anna

@bon_education

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3 Responses to “Students speak out: What does it mean to be a 21st Century Learner?”


  1. 1 Felicia L July 2, 2010 at 12:16 am

    Well it seems school districts seems to think an ideal 21st century classroom includes a couple of computers, maybe a smartboard. What happened to the wireless connection with students carrying laptops? My district just did the most outlandish thing of all. They bought themselves all Ipads with technology money and did not think about the students or the classroom. When does this kind of thinking stop?

  2. 2 Rachel May 23, 2011 at 7:26 am

    Hi, I am a freshman in high school and I have found that utilizing technology in classrooms makes it much more enjoyable and easier to learn. My social studies class last year was able to use several features on the iPod Touch, and there were many educational yet very interesting applications available. While I do not think that every aspect of every class can use this technology, it puts a modern and different take on learning.

  3. 3 2nd grade math worksheets September 24, 2011 at 10:45 pm

    Technology in the classrooms is the future of educations. It makes many dry topics in math such as fractions for young kids, very interesting and funny to learn.


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